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Welcome

Welcome Brian Goslow Nearly 50 years ago, I attended my first art exhibition at the Worcester Art Museum. At the age of 12, I had already become quite fond of neon through its use in our many dining cars and a few captivating buildings that always called out in the night. That first show, “Light […]


Nicholas Mancini, Holly to Hemlock Lily, 2016, monotype, paper, pastel, charcoal on canvas, 62" x 75"


FRESH EYES AT HELEN DAY: MFA STUDENTS SHINE

by Marta Pauer-Tursi The fourth biennial exhibition at Helen Day Art Center features the works of five MFA degree students from the Northeast. This year, more than 150 applicants’ works were considered for this juried exhibition. Four of the artists are women working in various mediums including painting, photography and sculpture. Two are from the […]


Left: The Couple Right: Jump Rope Bunny


A WONDER-FULL WORLD: PROP MASTER MICHAEL STASIUK

by Greg Morell The studio of Portsmouth artist Michael Stasiuk is a wonder world of creative imagination where obscure found objects are manipulated, jointed, glued and crafted into magical, animated, anthropomorphic spirits of fancy. Working with very simple tools — a drill, a small band saw, a series of hand tools — his wizardry of […]



Text in Contemporary Art at Jamestown Arts Center

The intersection of language and visual form provides both the tools and the subject of conceptual art. “WORD: Text in Contemporary Art” at the Jamestown Arts Center offers over 55 images, objects and installations contrasting canonical works with recent forays in the art-form. While concentrating on artists in southern New England, curator Karen Conway has also tapped collectors, galleries and artist studios in New York and the Midwest. Voyages at an end as well as explorations underway complement each other in the spacious former boat repair shop through early August.


Art Basel 2017 Art

(Clockwise, from top left) Reza Aramesh, Site of the Fall: Study of the Renaissance Garden, 2016-17, marble, topiary, Leila Heller, New York City, at Parcours, ArtBasel ; Sue Williamson, Messages from the Atlantic Passage, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa; Phyllida Barlow, untitled: 100banners2015, 2015, Hauser & Worth, Zurich; Thomas Struth, Paradise 28, Rio Madre de Dios, Peru 2005, 2005, chromogenic print, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin/Paris; Peter Regli, Reality Hacking No. 313, 2014, Levy Gorvy, New York.


THE MORNING AFTER: LOOKING BACK AT ART BASEL 2017

This year, Art Basel had something for everyone. Dominated by the motherlode of over 4,000 works of art shown by 226 exhibitors in the Galleries sector, Art Basel extended its universe to individual artist projects at Parcours, Unlimited, Statements and Features. The solo projects, the result of artist proposals, were politically aware, environmentally conscious and community oriented.


Subodh Gupta "Cooking the World”

Subodh Gupta, "Cooking the World” 2017, found aluminum utensils, monofilament line, steel, Gallery Continua, Italy.


ARTSCOPE’S GUIDE TO BASEL ART FAIRS 2017

It is a calmer year at Art Basel, but no less edgy. Escapist to a degree, the world sector-wide reflects a desire to hide under the covers, or at least spend time at a beach, eating a good meal or watching an entertaining, possibly animated film. Whereas the work last year implored us to speak an act, and sometimes revolt, we’ve now done it, and largely have had no effect. So, let’s have some fun. Many projects allow us just that.


Art Basel Art 2017

(Clockwise, from top left) Reza Aramesh, Site of the Fall: Study of the Renaissance Garden, 2016-17, marble, topiary, Leila Heller, New York City, at Parcours, ArtBasel ; Sue Williamson, Messages from the Atlantic Passage, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa; Phyllida Barlow, untitled: 100banners2015, 2015, Hauser & Worth, Zurich; Thomas Struth, Paradise 28, Rio Madre de Dios, Peru 2005, 2005, chromogenic print, Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin/Paris; Peter Regli, Reality Hacking No. 313, 2014, Levy Gorvy, New York.


ARTSCOPE AT ART BASEL SWITZERLAND: DAY TWO

First confronted by Al Wei Wei’s “Iron Tree” (2016), which changes patina as it ages, it also brings nature and the manmade relationship with nature into perspective. That relationship seems a theme of Parcours, curator Samuel Leuenberger’s brilliant trek through the city through the following of artwork installations. Reza Aramsh recreates Michelangelo’s “Slave” in resin, but tiesits hands behind his back with a rope, making him captive and towering on a plinth over the river. Katinka Bock’s “Parasite Fountain” (2017) creates ametal fish that draws water from a neighboring fountain, thus the parasite description, and does not give it back. It uses the water for itself. Politics has come into the work now.


Art Basel Entrance

Art Basel Entrance


ARTSCOPE AT ART BASEL SWITZERLAND: DAY ONE

Done with the hard-hitting political landscape of last year’s work here, and taking a breather, maybe literally, everyone’s happier seeing fewer political statement or in your face art. A lot is concentrating on the process, the materials and the bringing in of concrete, beads, aluminum screening and more for innovative treatments of material.


Clemens Kalischer and Familly

Clemens Kalischer and family at the opening reception for his “Between Past and Future: Clemens Kalischer’s Vermont” exhibition at Bennington Museum (photo by Marguerite Serkin).


Between Past and Future: Clemens Kalischer’s Vermont at Bennington Museum

Bennington Museum hosted an artist reception on the afternoon of June 3rd to honor legendary photographer Clemens Kalischer. Now on view in the museum’s ground floor gallery, “Between Past and Future: Clemens Kalischer’s Vermont” provides a wide sampling of Mr. Kalischer’s masterfully- composed portraits that span more than six decades of Vermont life.


In the Count’s garage where he keeps the cars in tip-top shape, Figaro (Evan Hughes, r.) helps Susanna (Emily Birsan) imagine their upcoming nuptials in Boston Lyric Opera’s production of “The Marriage of Figaro.” Photoraph by T. Charles Erickson.

In the Count’s garage where he keeps the cars in tip-top shape, Figaro (Evan Hughes, r.) helps Susanna (Emily Birsan) imagine their upcoming nuptials in Boston Lyric Opera’s production of “The Marriage of Figaro.” Photograph by T. Charles Erickson.


Boston Lyric Opera presents The Marriage of Figaro at John Hancock Hall

In Boston’s venerable John Hancock Hall, a few steps down Berkeley Street and just off Copley Square, our own Boston Lyric Opera roars into town with an enduring classic, a smoking hot bedroom comedy that offended one emperor, Joseph 2nd of the Hapsburg Empire, and King Louis XVI. Threats of censorship loomed, then dissipated.