Artscope Magazine Logo

It Doesn’t Hurt To Ask: Miami 2017 Satellite Fairs

Doug Powell, "Liberty", 2017, upcycled computer keys, 76” x 100”, at Spectrum Miami.


EVENT
MIAMI ART WEEK
ART MIAMI ARTMIAMI.COM
CONTEXT ART MIAMI CONTEXTARTMIAMI. COM
RED DOT MIAMI REDDOTMIAMI.COM
SCOPE ART SHOW SCOPE-ART.COM
SPECTRUM MIAMI ART SHOW
SPECTRUM-MIAMI. COM
UNTITLED ART FAIR UNTITLEDARTFAIRS. COM

by Nancy Nesvet

Taking advantage of the huge crowds of art collectors in Miami and Miami Beach for Art Basel Miami 2017, the artwork at satellite fairs — often blatantly political — this year was new, older, relevant, colorful, glitzy and humorous. Work at Art Miami and Context, over the bridge into downtown Miami, was gutsy, with artists using new technology and materials; artists were having fun but asking important questions and expressing opinions in unambiguous language. These were the standout artists and works and the fair in which they were shown:

CONTEXT ART MIAMI
Represented by the Blink Group Fine Art Gallery, Boston artist Liliana Marquez (“I Am What I See, See What I Am”) calls herself an eco-artist. Influenced by Pop Art, she uses samples of mass production to produce text pieces asking us “to rethink art in a positive way, reclaiming materials and transforming them into art.” Korean artist Jongsook Kim’s “Artificial Landscape — Mountain Gold” (2017, cut crystals on canvas, Gallery NOW) showed a golden mountain foregrounding white, snow-covered mountains. In her digital print, “Frame City,” textile curtains partially obscured a distant moon-like landscape. Columbian artist Federico Uribe, now working in Miami (who has shown at Mass MOCA), created a powerful “Horse and Bear” sculpture made of spent bullets (2017, Adelson Galleries, Boston and New York); he is making art from the remnants of destructive power.

SCOPE ART FAIR
Scope informed, declared and showed action taken. Brazilian artist Dora Longo Bahia, in her series depicting “human made disasters” entitled “Nuclear Accidents” (2017, Gallery Vermelho, San Paulo), painted abandoned theme parks in the nuclear disaster sites Chernobyl and Fukushima on burning orange grounds. Shock and Awe! Tim Okamura’s photograph, “I am V.ITA” (2017, oil on graphite, Meijler Art) declaring, “I am my ancestor’s wildest dreams,” brought awareness of immigrants. Martin C. Herbst’s “Perpetual_Mirror,” (2017, oil and lacquer on stainless steel, Anthony Brunelli Fine Arts) with spheres on the floor and half mirrored, reflected our image if we lowered ourselves to floor level.

To read more, pick up a copy of our latest issue! Find a pick-up location near you or Subscribe Here.

Share: