Artscope Magazine Logo See Current Exhibitions page for the AS breaking news feed


Live daily and weekly coverage on the AS zine and A/V


 
 


artscope magazine: May/June 2010
Welcome Statement: Brian Goslow, managing editor
Letters to the Editor
roundtable - Three Professionals. One Question.
cornered: a conversation with an art exhibition attendee
through the lens - NORMAN ROCKWELL: BEHIND THE CAMERA
gallery spotlight - Gallery Ehva
Selections From WHO SHOT ROCK & ROLL
The Language of Linearity - Christine Hiebert
FIERY POOL, The Maya and the Mystic Sea
SACRED=ART?
SMFA Traveling Scholars
BEAUTY LEFT BEHIND - THE WORK OF JOAN WALTON
GOING FORWARD, LOOKING BACK - PRACTICING HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSES IN THE 21ST CENTURY
wanderlust feature- artscoping THE BERKSHIRES: LENOX AND PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS
wanderlust feature - Mid-Cape Musings
THERE AND NOT THERE - Rust Portraits By Esther Solondz
KAHN/SELESNICK CITY OF SALT
VIEWS AND RE-VIEWS: Soviet Political Posters and Cartoons
61st Annual Art Of the Northeast Exhibition
SHADOW PEOPLE: Paintings By Michaela D'Angelo
TRACING THE LIVING JOURNEY - Kevork Mourad: Paintings
MORE THAN PRETTY: Tom Paiement's Entropy Aftermath A, B, C, X
theater - STAGING A COMEBACK: THE NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE
community - ATLANTIC WORKS GALLERY: AN ART-WORTHY VESSEL
Capsule Previews
GOING FORWARD, LOOKING BACK - PRACTICING HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHIC PROCESSES IN THE 21ST CENTURY
James Foritano



Trustman Art Gallery, Simmons Gallery, Main Building
300 The Fenway, Fourth Floor
Boston

Through May 28


Curated by Stephen Halpert of the university of New England Art Gallery in Portland, Maine, this traveling exhibition has been whittled down to fit the trustman Gallery’s space. Yet, even with fewer examples of the 24 photographers’ work, it’s a big show.



Think of black and white, which is the spare color range most of us are familiar with in traditional photography, then think of black and white tugged and teased, darkened and lightened until a family of secondary tones fills each still life, portrait or landscape with an abundance of nuance.



This much nuance reads more like a paragraph than a one-liner and, consequently, for an adequate “reading” this viewer felt the need for both a good vantage point and a good chair — maybe a wellupholstered Victorian rocker.



The antique processes used by the crafty artists showcased here arrived with a splash through the long, circuitous history of photography: ambrotypes, cyanotypes, tintypes, calotypes, etc. Google will find them for you, define them, explain why each failed to achieve lasting popularity and, if you aren’t discouraged by the expense, painstaking detail and sheer impracticality, give you step by step by step-by-step recipes. Good luck!



Most people, with good reason, are discouraged. Others, with equally good reason, have persisted. One of the persistent is David Strasburger and one of the fruits of his persistence is in this exhibition: “Spring Snow,” a gold-toned rallitype.



The play of light in “Spring Snow” reminds one more of a painting than a snapshot. The gleam of a white porcelain teapot anchors the left foreground, while an upright roll of paper towels glimmers in dark counterpoint. In the right background, the spring snow seen through a double window behind a soapstone sink is a diaphanous veil against a spare scene of trees and a barn.



For the rest, there’s the usual detail of kitchen paraphernalia framing this transient, eternal scene, but no clutter. Each volume exists in a fascinating stasis of light and dark just about to change; self-composed within the larger composition, they echo the volatility of the weather outside, reflecting and absorbing its changeable light.



Keliy Anderson-Staley works the same magic with a modern studio interior in Queens, New York — probably hers. It’s a pedestrian scene of necessary order with like materials stored in plastic tubs or shelved in neat piles. But, again, the tango of light and dark within the larger composition lends liveliness to this scene, which echoes here not the weather, but the mind of the artist, ever alert for new symbolic forms to pour itself artfully into.



Bev Conway creates portraits with the chemicals and mechanics of the ambrotype process. “Caitlin” and “Nate” have a spare, casual modernity about them, but their final sum eludes a quick glance. They are compositions of light and dark as ineffable as




Read the entire article in our magazine pages...

 

Select an artscope issue



Now Available: the artscope Newsstand Edition -Explore interactive features
-Designed especially for iPad
-Receive new issues instantly as they become available on Apple Newsstand
-Download a FREE preview!
The Newsstand edition is live!

 


The artscope Mobile App


-Multiple live news feeds
-Explore more than 50 featured exhibits, galleries and artists
-Interact and communicate with AS and other cultural outlets

 

 

 


Share on Facebook


 

FAQ - ABOUT US - CONTACT - ADVERTISE - CAREERS - DIGITAL EDITION - WHERE TO PICK UP A COPY - TERMS OF USE - ARTSCOPE APPS - CLASSIFIEDS - PRESS PAGE- PURCHASE COPIES   

Instagram

 



Copyright 2014 Artscope Magazine